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Tahitian Language Course, Audio CD, Learn, Speak, Instruction

  1. Tahitian ~ 101 Languages of the World, CD ROM Course.

    $59.95 set of 4 CD ROM + $6.80 p&h or $12.80 foreign delivery

    Item Code : TRAN4339

    Tahitian ~ 101 Languages of the World, CD ROM Course.
    For Windows or Macintosh computers. Features: Up to 5,000 words and Survival Phrases, and 100's of sentences in context for each language. Contains interactive dialogs; conversation practice; fully integrated native speaker sound; record, playback and compare; SlowSound digital speech analysis; challenging games, etc; and shows you exactly how to meet and greet people, make polite conversation, order in restaurants, ask for directions, deal with banks and taxi drivers, handle emergencies, and more. 101 languages on a set of 4 CD ROM discs. his is a fun way to learn and speak the Tahitian language.
  2. Pacific Languages: An Introduction.

    $48.95 + $6.80 p&h or $14.80 foreign delivery

    Item Code : UHAW4340

    Pacific Languages: An Introduction.
    University of Hawaii Press. 384 pages. Includes illustrations and maps. Almost one-quarter of the world's languages are (or were) spoken in the Pacific, making it linguistically the most complex region in the world. Although numerous technical books on groups of Pacific or Australian languages have been published, and descriptions of individual languages are available, until now there has been no single book that attempts a wide regional coverage for a general audience. Pacific Languages introduces readers to the grammatical features of Oceanic, Papuan, and Australian languages as well as to the semantic structures of these languages. For readers without a formal linguistic background, a brief introduction to descriptive linguistics is provided. In addition to describing the structure of Pacific languages, this volume places them in their historical and geographical context, discusses the linguistic evidence for the settlement of the Pacific, and speculates on the reason for the region's many languages. It devotes considerable attention to the effects of contact between speakers of different languages and to the development of Pidgin and Creole languages in the Pacific. Throughout, technical language is kept to a minimum without oversimplifying the concepts or the issues involved. A glossary of technical terms, maps, and diagrams help identify a language geographically or genetically; reading lists and a language index guide the researcher interested in a particular language or group to other sources of information. Here at last is a clear and straightforward overview of Pacific languages for linguists and anyone interested in the history of sociology of the Pacific.